Three Capes Track, Tasmania

I must admit to being a bit slack lately with updating this blog – and for that my apologies to you all, my bad. But I do have something to update you with now, a few weeks ago, along with Kim who did the last Everest trek with me, I took on the Three Capes Track in Tasmania. What a wonderful hike, we thoroughly enjoyed it. Oh, and another apology … for the length of this post, I think I got carried away, but there’s so much more I could have written. I might have to do another post soon on the actual practicalities of the hike. *************************************************************** The Three Capes Track walk starts, strangely enough, with a boat ride. Day 1 – Port Arthur to Surveyors The starting point for the walk is the Port Arthur settlement, where we met the other hikers who would be keeping us company in the evenings when we all met up at the end of each day. Although up to 48 people can set off each day it’s an independent walk – you go at your own pace but meet up at huts that have been purpose built for each of the three overnight stops. The boat trip around Port Arthur takes just over an hour and our guide Ben was an absolute fount of knowledge, pointing out Sea Eagles and their nests and explaining all about the formation of the dolomite cliffs and the caves beneath them. And then it was time to get serious! Although I’ve done a few serious treks in the last few years I’ve only ever had to carry a day pack, this...

Flinders Island: an unspoiled haven

Flinders Island had me hooked. I was there for just over four hours and the weather was lousy, but I loved it. The biting wind cut into us as we crossed the tarmac and it was bitterly cold despite the fact that it was supposed to be spring, but apparently spring here is renowned for being windy. The wind had been forecast, and it was cold and overcast when we left Melbourne in the Beechcraft, but the clouds cleared by the time we arrived and the descent over the western side of the island gave us glimpses of the diverse landscape, with sandy dunes edging coastal lagoons and impressive, rugged, granite ridges running the length of the island. Apart from a weekly cargo ferry that carries a limited number of passengers, this is the only way of getting to the island. Leaving the small airport we escaped the wind and climbed into our waiting rental car. Flinders Island, the largest island in the Furneaux group just off the north east coast of Tasmania, has around 450 kilometres of road and, with no public transport on the island, a car is a necessity. Our pilot and guide Dale, who has a place on the island ‘not yet habitable’ he says, but he has a plan, explains that you have to wave to passing drivers, it’s a tradition. And so it is, the driver of every car that we pass acknowledges us. Out of the airport we headed for nearby Whitemark, the civic and commercial centre of Flinders Island. With a population of less than a thousand, spread over 1300km², the...
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